Peace with Eagle-Eye SurveillanceIRSEarth and Man in Balance
Center for Physiology and Biophysics

Centers of Excellence - Answers Today Preventing Problems Tomorrow a blank space::>> admin <<::

Center for Physiology and Biophysics: News of the Day
  1. 'Jumping genes' help stabilize DNA folding patterns
    The DNA molecule inside the nucleus of any human cell is more than six feet long. To fit into such a small space, it must fold into precise loops that also govern how genes are turned on or off. New research indicates that 'jumping genes' play a surprising role in stabilizing the 3D folding patterns of the DNA molecule inside the cell's nucleus.

  2. Why cells need acidic lysosomes
    Little organs within cells called lysosomes digest unwanted material. And like stomachs, they must be acidic to do so. If they aren't, cells stop growing. Researchers wanted to know why.

  3. Snake stem cells used to create venom-producing organoids
    Organoids have become an important tool for studying many disease processes and testing potential drugs. Now, they are being used in a surprising and unexpected way: for the production of snake venom. Researchers are reporting that they have created organoids of the venom glands of the Cape coral snake (Aspidelaps lubricus cowlesi) and that these glands are capable of producing venom.
    West Nile virus triggers brain inflammation by inhibiting protein degradation
    West Nile virus (WNV) inhibits autophagy -- an essential system that digests or removes cellular constituents such as proteins -- to induce the aggregation of proteins in infected cells, triggering cell death and brain inflammation (encephalitis), according to researchers.

  4. A new blood component revealed
    Does the blood we thought to know so well contain elements that had been undetectable until now? The answer is yes, according to a team of researchers which has revealed the presence of whole functional mitochondria in the blood circulation. The discovery may deepen our knowledge of physiology and open up new avenues for treatment.

  5. Of quirky channels and a fond farewell

    This final installment of Generally Physiological concerns F-selective channels, a surprising role for a tryptophan in determining channel identity, and a farewell note from the Executive Editor of The Journal of General Physiology.

(a) Bordetella pertussis...



    Content Management Powered by UTF-8 CuteNews


    Posts


SUBSCRIBE

  Name
E-Mail


ALL subscribe/unsubscribe requests must be confirmed via email.

About IRS

Institute for Responsible Science (IRS) is an aggregate of leading advocacy Centers that seek to protect the public from abuses in the arenas of unsafe products, predatory lending, false advertising, pseudoauthoritarians, energy, health and pollution.


LinkShare_125x125ButtonV1
Copyright © 2003 - :: Institute for Responsible Science / msgrafx.net/irs/ :: All Rights Reserved